Signs that Your Cat is Talking to Its Feline Friends

It is pretty usual yet surprising to know that cats talk to each other. Have you ever wondered what the conversation is all about when you see your cats talking to their feline friends? Cats have different tones (meows) of vocalization set aside to communicate different feelings. If they are anxious, confident, angry, or soothing, they let their friends know all about it. 

Cat Is Talking To Its Feline Friends

According to several studies, the cat’s environment plays a critical role in vocalizing their feelings. Pet cats tend to have efficient vocalization behaviors than feral cats. 

If you want to gain insight into your cats’ behaviors, this article will help you understand their communication skills.

Read More:

Different Signs of Cats Talking to Its Feline Friends

Cats often exhibit verbal and non-verbal cues. They also use their hormones to let other cats know they are comfortable around them or mark their territory.

Meowing Loudly

Cats tend to vocalize their communication when conveying their feelings to their human parent than to other cats. For example, your cat will let you know when it is hungry. While talking to other cats, though, you will hear a lot less meowing.

A loud meow is an indication of fear or anxiety. Cats take time to adjust to new surroundings. If you have brought a new cat home, it might let your old pet know it is scared. When your cats are growling at each other, it would be best to keep your distance as they are signs of aggression.

Cat mothers will purr to soothe their kittens. Purring is used by cats to show they are content. Kittens, in general, meow more than adult cats. They use verbal cues to communicate their needs to their mother.  

Showing Affection

Cats, especially adults, will often use body language to communicate rather than vocalization. For example, when greeting each other, they will rub their noses or bodies against each other. 

Cats show their affection toward their feline friends by licking the top of their heads or their hearts to soothe their anxiety or cheer them up if they are unhappy. Cats are also playful. For example, they will roll over on their back to let other cats know they are friendly and would like to play with them.

If you have multiple cats in your home, you can look at their eyes and ears to understand the group atmosphere. For example, if your cat has his ears up and eyes shut, it means he is content, safe, and comfortable among his friends. On the other hand, ears down flat and eyes wide open are signs of aggression. 

Spraying or Sniffing

The scent is an important means of communication in the feline world. For example, when born, kittens largely depend on the scent of their mother to move around. Similarly, cats use the scent of their friends to familiarize themselves and let each other know they are comfortable in their presence.

Spraying is another behavior cats can exhibit when under stress or when communicating their sexual needs. For example, if you have multiple cats in your home, spraying will be used to mark their territory, a sign that other cats should stay away, a sign that other cats very well understand. Spraying also indicates that the cat is ready for mating.

Listen to your cat’s meow, if it is a loud meow, a soft purr, or a howl. You can accordingly help soothe them or get out of their way. If you find your cat sniffing another cat’s butt, do not worry, it is considered affectionate behavior among feline friends. Keep an eye on their non-verbal cues. 

So now, when you see your cats talking to each other, feel free to join in on their conversation. The state of their eyes and ears can let you know if they are comfortable or anxious. 

Leave a Comment